iOS Device Summary: March 2016 Updates

I’ve updated my iOS Device Summary with hardware announced at the Apple event on March 21, 2016.

Check out the iOS Device Summary page for more info about the idea behind the summary as well as PDF downloads—including optimized files for printing.

A few notes on the newly introduced hardware:

The introduction of the 9.7-inch iPad Pro means even more users will be putting the Apple Pencil and Smart Keyboard through its paces. Even if your app is not a drawing or text-centric, you might consider having at least one size of iPad Pro with these accessories for development and testing.

The iPhone SE brings paris a well-established iOS screen resolution with a faster processor. From a testing perspective, apps that perform well on previous 4-inch devices should perform even better on the new hardware.

Only the display of the 9.7-inch iPad Pro has the new True Tone feature.

The Night Shift feature introduced in iOS 9.3 is available to devices using at least an A7 chip—every device on the 64-bit side of the divide on the summary chart.

I hope you find this version of the chart helpful. •

Chart depicting iOS devices by screen size, processor and supported OS version

 

iOS Device Summary: Fall 2015 Updates

I’ve updated my iOS Device Summary with hardware announced at the Apple event on September 9, 2015. This edition drops iOS 5 and A4-based devices to make way for iOS 9 and the A9 and A9X.

(This update has taken a little while—I’ve been busy helping to build a new cloud computer at Upthere.  I’m excited to say that we launched yesterday. I encourage you to learn more and join the beta at upthere.com.)

Check out the iOS Device Summary page for more info about the idea behind the summary as well as PDF downloads—including optimized files for printing.

The biggest news this fall is the iPad Pro, which introduces the largest iOS screen size ever, but also two new Apple accessories that may be important to test your app with: the Apple Pencil and the Smart Keyboard. On the other new devices, iPhone and iPad screen resolutions remain the same and get faster processors. From a testing perspective, things that perform well on last year’s models should perform even better on the new hardware.

It is also interesting to note that all of the devices that can run iOS 6 are on the 32-bit side of the processor divide.

I hope you find this version of the chart helpful. •

Chart depicting iOS devices by screen size, processor and supported OS version

iOS Device Summary: A8 iPod Touch Update

I’ve updated my iOS Device Summary with the newly announced iPod touch.

You can check out the iOS Device Summary page for more info about the summary plus PDF downloads—including optimized files for printing.

For developers, the iPod touch has been a useful, relatively inexpensive compact device for testing. The previous model was released almost four years ago and sits at the very low end of devices that support iOS 8 and iOS 9.  The new sixth generation iPod touch is a welcome addition as a more affordable testing device with a recent 64-bit processor.  Like previous generations, the new iPod touch has a 4-inch display, so an iPhone is still needed for on-device testing of larger screen resolutions.

It is interesting to note that every iOS device that Apple currently sells, except the iPhone 5c, has a 64-bit processor.

This also means that if you need to acquire older models for testing iOS 8 and iOS 9, you will need to turn to refurbished or used devices.

I hope you find this version of the chart helpful. •

Chart depicting iOS devices by screen size, processor and supported OS version

iOS Device Summary: iOS 9 Update

I’ve updated my iOS Device Summary with the iOS 9 info Apple has publicly posted.

Check out the iOS Device Summary page for the rationale behind the summary plus PDF downloads—including optimized files for printing.

Some things to note from WWDC announcements and Apple product lineup changes:

All devices that support iOS 8 will also support iOS 9.

Apps are currently required to support both 32-bit and 64-bit processors. With iOS 9, the App Store will also accept apps that are 64-bit only. This allows developers to limit deployment of an app to more recent devices with faster CPUs and GPUs. The device summary now has a line showing where 32-bit ends and 64-bit begins.

Finally, devices for testing:

  • At $199, the 16 GB, 5th generation iPod touch is still the most affordable compact iOS 9 device
  • At $299, the 16 GB, WiFi iPad mini 2 is now the most affordable iOS 9 iPad
  • As of 6/19/15, the original iPad mini is discontinued—try used and refurbished devices for low-end iPad testing.

I hope you find this version of the chart helpful. •

Chart depicting iOS devices by screen size, processor and supported OS version

iOS Device Summary: iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3 Update

It’s been a busy few weeks with Apple announcements and Backtrace, our new album of iOS and Mac development songs, hitting the Billboard charts. I’ve updated my iOS Device Summary to include the recently announced iPads.

Check out the iOS Device Summary page for the rationale behind the summary as well as PDF downloads—including optimized files for printing.

The new iOS devices introduced this fall presented some challenges for the summary chart:

The iPad mini 2 and iPad mini 3 have identical processors and screens. The devices appear on the chart as a single entry, split to reflect the different supported OS versions.

We have not seen a revised iPod touch in two years. With the traditional Apple fall events behind us, it is unlikely we will see a significant update until next fall at the earliest. Since the iPod touch line ends at the A5 chip and the multiple-model iPhones start at the A6 chip, these have been combined into a single row.

Finally, the new A8X chip pushes the number of columns to the limit, so I’ve dropped the ARM chip and the iPhone 3GS and 3rd Generation iPod touch from the chart.

Since the chart is starting to have trouble cleanly representing devices on a single page, I am looking at more dynamic ways of presenting this information in the future.

Until then, I hope you find this version of the summary chart helpful. •

Chart depicting iOS devices by screen size, processor and supported OS version
Check out the iOS Device Summary page to learn more and download printable PDFs of the summary.
And check out Backtrace, the only album of iOS and Mac development tunes ever on the Billboard charts.

Updated iOS Device Summary with iPad Air and new iPad mini

I’ve updated my iOS Device Summary to include the newly-announced iPad Air and iPad mini with Retina Display.

Check out the iOS Device Summary page for the rationale behind the summary plus PDF downloads—including files optimized for printing.

Chart depicting iOS devices by screen size, processor and supported OS version, including newly introduced iPad Air and iPad mini with Retina DisplayCheck out the iOS Device Summary page to learn more and download PDFs of the summary.

Updated iOS Device Summary with iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C

I’ve updated my iOS Device Summary to include the newly-announced iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C.

Check out the iOS Device Summary page for the rationale behind the summary plus PDF downloads—including files optimized for printing.

Chart depicting iOS devices by screen size, processor and supported OS version, including newly introduced iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C

Check out the iOS Device Summary page to learn more and download PDFs of the summary.

Getting an app ready for iPhone 5

I was traveling the week between the iPhone 5 announcement and release. I returned from my trip champing at the bit to update my app WALT to use the entire 4-inch display, instead of being stuck in the letterbox ghetto. Updating turned out to be simple and straightforward.  Here’s how it went.

Out of the letterbox

The first step was getting out of the letterbox.  To do this, I upgraded the project to use the iOS 6 SDK and added a new 640 × 1136 launch image for the new screen size. Like all launch images, it needed to have a particular name: Default-568h@2x.png. There’s a lot of information encoded in that file name—the default launch image name, the screen height, the high-resolution size and the image format.

Enabling a feature by adding a specially-named image is a clever and compact approach, but it is not very obvious or discoverable on its own.  Xcode 4.5 helps by displaying a project warning and offering to create the new launch image for you.  (Although I see the warning now in a test project, I don’t remember seeing it when I updated WALT.)

Xcode 4.5 adds a few other features to support development for Retina 4 displays. The iOS Simulator has a new hardware device setting so you can test your app with the new size, even if you haven’t been able to get your hands on an iPhone 5.

When viewing storyboards, Interface Builder makes it very easy to toggle between Retina 3.5 and Retina 4 sizes using a newly-added resize button.

Resize button in Interface Builder

New resize button toggles storyboards between 3.5 and 4-inch views

If you are not using storyboards, Interface Builder still has you covered.  You can change the screen size for a top-level view in the Simulated Metrics section of the attributes inspector. This setting is also available with storyboards, but I have found the single toggle to be much more convenient to use.

Screenshot of simulated metrics options in Interface Builder

Choose which size to work with in a xib

Mostly done already

Since WALT uses standard tab, navigation and table views, there was nothing additional required to effectively use the additional screen space. Each table view became taller and now displays more content. I could have released the app as-is, but wanted to do a few tweaks.

On a Retina 3.5 screen, the film detail view in my app adjusts row heights in certain cases to improve the layout.  I needed to make different adjustments for Retina 4 screens, so I needed to tell the two screen sizes apart.  The new screen size is not a different user interface idiom—just a taller iPhone. For screen size, the highest level API available is to use UIScreen to get the height of the main screen:

 CGFloat mainScreenHeight = [UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.height;

I‘ve already seen a number of online examples that use the screen size to add convenience category methods to UIScreen or UIDevice.  In my case, I checked the screen size inline in the one place where it was needed.

Screenshot of the film detail of 'Partysaurus Rex' in the app WALT.

What Up, Fishes?!
The newly added ‘Partysaurus Rex’ looks nice and comfy, all stretched out on a beautiful iPhone 5 in the new version of WALT.

Although my experience was quick and painless, the amount of work needed to adapt an app for 4-inch screens varies greatly depending on its contents.  The iOS Human Interface Guidelines document suggests different approaches for various situations. It also makes a very important point that applies to all apps.  An app should remain the same app, with the same features and interaction, regardless of which screen size it is being displayed on.  But, when displayed on a 4-inch screen, it should reveal more of its content.

In summary, getting your app to stretch out to the full iPhone 5 screen is as easy as updating to the latest SDK and adding a new launch image.  Getting your app to look great, however, will depend on how customized your views are.

For me, I found that getting the app ready for iPhone 5 took less time than preparing the new set of taller screenshots required for the App Store. •

WALT 1.0.1 is available now in the App Store with iPhone 5 and iOS 6 support.